Nutrition

Ruthless Performer Q&A – Maximizing Health Span with Kyle Fisher

Posted on Updated on

**Editor’s Note: Today’s Ruthless Performer Q&A Series is one of the most expansive in the Q&A series to-date. Like many health professionals, Kyle’s own history in sports and wellness lends credibility to many of his thoughts on health and maximizing the health of athletes and the general population. If you like what Kyle has to say, check out his Youtube page (links provided throughout the text). Enjoy!**

 

1. Hey Kyle, glad to have you on the site… We worked together in college, but you’ve since came back onto my radar with a video you recently put out that was pretty critical of the modern health care system. What was the chain of events that made you view our healthcare system so unfavorably? What was the straw that broke the camel’s back and lead to you to make that youtube video?

The chain began with myself at a young age while in middle school my body began showing warning signs of early degradation of my joints that carried on into high school as well. Don’t get me wrong I played hard. I never really had a good internal gauge of when to slow down and just play for fun. I was the guy going 1,000 miles per hour at all times. It didn’t matter if it was dodgeball or riding a goat it was all at my best effort. But the immobilization and rest prescription never made sense to me. Before the age of 14 I had 2 ankle casts, 2 full leg casts and a corset back brace applied for a stress fracture in L4 and L5. After all these immobilization techniques and very little rehab you can imagine the insuffiencines that were creeping up in my musculoskeletal and nervous system alike. I felt confused and not well understood during these conservative treatment techniques and believed more could be done. Why not add in an abundance of z packs for sinus infections with the side effect of increased chances of achilles tendon ruptures to the mix.  So I continued on my merry way through high school with an unbalanced motor and a broken down immune system. My skin began showing signs of immune system malfunction with acne and a condition called vitiligo that failed conservative medical doctor directed treatments for 8 years. Between dermatologist and orthopedic appointments I had about all but given up on this whole idea of health.

Around this point I had started spending time with a local chiropractor Dr. Lee Lausch that had treated me with a non – traditional modality called the ARP electrical stimulation unit. This really blew me away as it got me back significantly faster than any other treatment I had tried in the past (rest and ice). So I began asking more questions and that’s when the flood gates opened. He began providing me with information on nutrition and really from there I began viewing the world through this lens of the body can heal itself. Just at the point where Dr. Lausch and I really began connecting my father had gotten into a traumatic accident. During football camp my senior season a truck had fallen on him and he broke 36 bones in his body. He survived, in which I am so thankful for all the modern medical system has to offer in regards to trauma care. Once they patched him back up is when the wheels started to fall off. He had his entire right femur replaced with a metal rod. His left ankle was in pieces and needed to be put back together. So they essentially did a full ankle replacement. This didn’t last long. He was out hiking one day looking for turkeys as he is an avid archery hunter. The ankle replacement had failed quickly and we later found out the bone was necrotic. The surgeon mistakenly anchored the metal into bone that had little integrity. There was no other option at this point but to amputate his leg from the mid calf down.

Yet no fault taken for this complete lack of patient care or pure ignorance to the integrity of the bone. Now this poor guy is 10 plus surgeries in and can’t seem to find his way out. His phantom pain is real now from the amputation, he can’t sleep and he feels constant jolts of electricity going down to his foot. This seems to be common after an amputation and this field needs more research focused here as it massively affects our veterans.

At this point hes taking a cocktail of medications mainly to control his pain, with the rest of the meds to manage the side effects. We’re 2 to 3 years in and his liver is struggling to keep up. The only thing this medication did was temporarily decrease pain and rip apart his body from the inside out. He was getting more unhealthy, losing more of himself and ultimately slowly dying. I came home from college one day and things began to click. One of the last doctor appointments I went to with him they recommended a battery powered device to place into his sacral plexus. This was intended to shut off the pain signals to his lower extremity. We both just stared in disbelief. Lets just say we walked out confused without answers. My dad was at his last resort and that was getting off the meds, begin exercising, fixing his nutrition and using alternative modalities and physicians to get back on track. The results were astounding. Within 6 months he had completely got off his medication, lost give or take 50 pounds and actually started to live his life again. Solely from the pure will of his heart. Not guided by a physician.  

Here’s the loophole that he discovered that most people will never tell you. And quite frankly what they don’t want you to know. His medical doctor didn’t want him off medication. The only thing his nurses ever called him for were to check and ensure he was taking his meds. If he didnt fill his script in time you better believe they were calling in minutes to question why that didn’t happen. Workers compensation won’t pay for much of any alternative therapy beyond what big pharma doesn’t control. But here’s what they will cover. And this is exactly what my dad did to get his life back. A massage from a licensed massage therapist, a gym membership, physical therapy and chiropractic care. You mix in some quality supplementation and a whole foods diet and voila you have your recipe for success.

The problem was who was going to tell us this? First, the person has to be open to it and that is definitely step number one. But our medical doctor wasn’t getting a cut to tell him he gained weight and needs to lose weight. Their concern wasn’t directed on fixing. It was solely directed at managing. We had to piece this together through trial and error. You get what you get because you do what you do. If you allow the system to guide you, you can only get out of that system what they offer. You don’t know what you don’t know.

Well now I know and I’m here to express my story. This was 10 years ago the alternative health movement wasn’t as mainstream as its slowly becoming.

 

2. What roles have you played in the healthcare system? What do you do currently?

I have played many roles in the healthcare system. It began with personal training at the chiropractors office I mentioned previously. Here I was training highschool and Division I athletes all the way up to 70 year old mail carriers using the super slow method on MedX machines. We focused on metabolic specific training from the book Body by Science written by Doug McGuff, M.D. If you haven’t read this I highly recommend it.

From here I went to Florida International University to do my graduate work in Athletic Training. As a student I spent time in Division IA football and soccer, NFL with the Cleveland Browns, Orthopedic Urgent Care with a Upper Extremity surgeon and a Private High School. During my time here I also continued studying nutrition with a focus on holistic healing, which was the missing link that I continually found within my more than 2,000 hours of clinical experience in school. It’s the large pink elephant in the room and nobody wants to address it. Because the reality is, the majority of folks in these settings have little to no knowledge on the topic which is a system flaw not a personal issue. So really the only way you get proper nutritional training is if you take the time to do it yourself. Period. If you’re not learning you’re dying. Athletic trainers must have an overseeing physician in most states to practice. Medical Doctors volunteer for teams to get their ‘in’ for more prospects for their clinic to produce of course more money. What the orthopedic doctor says goes.

I saw the small influence the athletic trainer really had when push came to shove. Especially when speaking on the NFL and athletic trainers role in that setting. They’re puppets to the medical doctors and physical therapists. Why hire highly trained medical professionals (ATC’s) then disregard their skill set? Once this really clicked for me I decided the NFL was certainly not for me. I passed my board exam early in February before I graduated and accepted a job in march to work as an athletic trainer at a NAIA school in Maine. Everyone thought I was out of my mind for accepting this job due to the location being in northern Maine.

What most didnt know is that I as the primary caregiver for 110 college athletes with no outside influence. I was able to run the strength and conditioning programs, implement injury prevention programs for warm ups, take the athletes grocery shopping and facilitate healing through nutritional understanding and direct application. I wanted to see what I could do with a group of individuals with this approach of an all encompassing program. I was in absolute heaven. 4 of the 5 teams I worked with made it to the national tournament. Men’s basketball made it to the final four and both mens and womens soccer teams won the national championship.

Unfortunately the majority of the staff left after this year so I parted ways as well, and moved to Texas. In Texas I worked for a small group of wellness centers that was developed and run by chiropractors. Here I was the movement director and the marketing director. My roles as the movement director included community health education, orthopedic evaluations, soft tissue application and corrective exercise. Here is where my understanding of community health and what the general populations thoughts were on health really expanded. Myself and the chiropractor would go into businesses to provide the employees a green smoothie and salad for lunch. In turn we would present on health and wellness and provide a quick posture screening. My biggest take away here was that people still weren’t connecting the dots between what is at the end of their fork and their health. As well as the degenerative effects of sitting under artificial light for 8-10 hours , staring into a computer while in high stress environments.

I mean how far can we possibly get from a human’s thriving environment? The typical american spends more than half their life in captivity which is essentially the example I just gave. From a 50,000 foot view of how the typical american lives it looks as if were living in a cage. At the end of the day we’re animals. No if, ands or buts about it.

Currently I am one of the athletic trainers at an all boys private high school in Miami Florida where I care for 1,000 athletes that participate in 22 different sports with a total of 50 sports teams. Its my absolute dream job. I perform exactly as NATA states: We collaborate with physicians to provide preventative services, emergency care, clinical diagnosis, therapeutic intervention and rehabilitation of injuries and medical conditions. I am the first person to see an injury and the last person to clear them to return to play. This is key for me as I advise the direction of the athletes referral and treat mainly all in house. This is what I learned early on about athletic training, that I feel most people are unaware of. We’re holistic healers and use nutrition, modalities and exercise to treat orthopedic injuries. It’s a beautiful process. You can essentially build and run a clinic exactly how you want within the confines of your licensure in that state.

 

3. I know you have experience with athletic training, what are your thoughts on this profession? Where should field of athletic training be applauded for doing a good job and where are mistakes being made?

I’m a big believer that your perception is your reality. Coming into the profession I was very hesitant on staying traditional–referring to working in an academic setting or for a professional sports team. For the sole reason that’s what I was exposed to at the time and it seemed as if athletic trainers are all burned out, overworked and underpaid. As a whole is this true? I believe so yes.

The reality is in medicine if you don’t work with insurance, prescribe medication or do surgery it’s difficult to make great money. Is it possible? Absolutely, but not common. What I discovered is athletic trainers are now everywhere in healthcare and it’s expanding which is awesome. It’s so important that you find your niche. Every job is very different from the next and that is so important to consider. Like my job in Maine. All the moving pieces were there they just needed someone to glue them together. I was told not to go time and time again.

As an AT you MUST be creative, open minded and adaptive at all times. If you’re open to that it will be a blast. Its fast pace, ever changing and always exciting. It’s certainly not for everyone. But I believe I found my jam.

Athletic training has been making bounds and leaps in the last 10 years. Especially here in Miami-Dade county. All public secondary schools are required to have an athletic trainer on site. I think this has been our biggest impact. Research and the implementation of evidence-based medicine is so important. Don’t get me wrong. But big picture and where I think the focus should be is on the youth. They are vulnerable and exposed to a lot of injuries, specifically concussions. This age group is in such a critical time in human development.

To have someone there on site to assist them with acute management and recovery of injuries. I believe we will continually keep sports safe and will remain developing the youth in a really positive way that just makes society an overall better place.

The mistakes are in athletic trainers allowing past culture nuances of athletic training to continue in the growth that is now taking place. All athletic trainers are now required to have a master of science degree in athletic training to practice. When previously it was a Bachelor’s degree. Degrees aren’t everything, but the cost vs benefit has to be there. The reality is as a seasonal athletic trainer that is board certified and licensed in the NFL typically makes between $8.50 and $15.00 an hour. This is for a 7 billion dollar company. Yikes. This is supposed to be the peak of the profession, huh? Not to mention athletic trainers are still taking jobs for $30,000 a year after giving over 1,000 hours of work for free and a $100,000 master’s degree. It makes absolutely no sense. Know your worth, create your value and stand by it.

 

4. It’s good to see someone involved in the well-being of young athletes being active and leading by example. What are you doing to maximize your health and wellness as an individual?

This is ultimately how I found athletic training. I wanted to know how to heal from injuries and to perform at a high level at all times not just in sports. I had to learn the foundation of this process by really understanding anatomy. I learned anatomy in undergrad but it was nothing remotely close to what I learned in the athletic training degree. From there I could expand.

My daily routine focuses are: mindset, nutrition, exercise, sunlight, giving back, sleep. In that order.

I’ve really focused on developing in my career to allow these to flourish as much as possible.

This is a big reason why I love my job so much. I go outside everyday, my job requires walking, running and lifting with sitting being a choice. The key focus and most rewarding part is to give back to others and help when they are in need. What a true blessing this really is.  

To develop my mindset for the day, I begin my day with gratitude and journaling. This has been the biggest game changer in my life. Setting your intention for the day, being thankful for what you have and sending out some motivational videos/quotes to loved ones that I think will help them that day. Knowing where to focus your consciousness daily can and will help you reach your goals. Instead of letting your day direct you, you direct your day.

Take my probiotic: ultimate flora fx on a empty stomach to create the optimal environment for digestion and immune function throughout my day

Chug a glass of clean water: zero water filter is what I use

Go through emails, write and listen to a collaboration of podcasts or videos for whatever I’m tackling that day.

Currently my favorites are Ram Dass here and now (podcast), Dr. Peter Glidden (youtube), bulletproof radio (podcast), and Chris Kresser’s book (your personal paleo code).

After my probiotic breaks down for about a half hour I introduce food which typically looks like 3-6 pasture raised eggs cooked over easy in grass fed butter along side smoked salmon, grass fed cheese and organic berries – this varies.

This is on days I exercise. If I know I’m not going to lift I will fast until lunch and just supplement throughout the morning.

My daily supplements in the morning currently are:

Tangy Tangerine 2.0 and Osteo FX: multivitamin and mineral powders

  • 60 minerals
  • 12 amino acids
  • 16 vitamins
  • All plant derived from organic/non-gmo ingredients

Read more about this here.

I’m currently detoxifyng my liver so I’m also mixing in that same drink a powder called Pollen burst: superoxide dismutase (SOD)/Gliadin complex  

  • Created from Flower pollen
  • To Increase antioxidant pathways

Read more about this here.

Also, Ultimate EFA plus.

  • Fatty acids from Borage, Flax and Fish (anchovy, Sardines and Pollock)
  • IFOS (international fish oil standard) certified
  • This is so essential as it tests the product for oxidation, heavy metals and potency along with many other specifications

Read more about this here.

I26 hyperimmune Egg: Immunoregulatory supplement that is well documented and quite an advancement in the ability to assist in arthritis healing and digestion.

Read more about this here.

Ultimate Selenium: This prevents many types of cancer specifically two types breast and prostate

  • Essential trace mineral

Read more about this here.

Zinc Fx: 48% of americans are deficient in zinc. This trace mineral isn’t talked about enough. 

  • It builds & supports immune system

Read more about this here.

 

Lift right before lunch:

What I have found for myself that works really well is quite simple. I lift weights/exercise for 30 minutes a day everyday. I believe the core foundation to a successful healthy lifestyle is rooted in quality and consistency not much of anything else. I don’t think there is a specific exercise that is going to correct anything in the body but more the collaboration of movement and consistency at which you perform that exercise. Currently because of the lifestyle I choose to live, training to become proficient in advanced lifts isnt what my focus is on. So I choose the most effective and efficient way for my body to prevent illness and thrive. Which for me and my physiology is 30 min a day of no short rest heavy lifting. I usually keep it to 3 to 4 different lifts that change frequently to attend to the SAID principle, the process of reversibility and engaging in different exercises to challenge my nervous system to generate growth in neural pathways.

What I don’t currently do enough of that I need to refocus on is just going outside and playing. The psychological aspect of creativity in exercise is so important and finding ways to move the body and challenge the nervous system with complex dynamic movements is key. Playing frisbee, golf, volleyball or climbing a tree and using the gifts we were given as humans is the best way to fulfill the human bodies requirements of advanced technological movement patterns that dampen quite fast if not used.

To categorize my diet to American fad diets you could say it’s a paleo diet mixed with keto fasting focusing on quality not quantity. I eat less and focus on high quality diversification of nutrient dense foods and supplementation. Most of my calories come from lunch. Lunch consists of a small amount of carbs such as white rice, yuca, sweet potatoes, plantains. With protein I try for two different types each meal between fish, eggs, pork, beef, and chicken. A large salad with fresh raw veggies and my dressing is ACV or balsamic vinegar. I like to include a majority of raw fruits and veggies as I’ve found this is what works best for me.

At lunch I do nutrition counseling with some athletes on what to eat for that day which keeps me accountable and learning everyday from them.

Dinner: Raw fruit and vegetable based. This has really worked for me and has been a great alteration in my diet that was a big change from how I grew up. Dinner was always the biggest meal to now dinner being my smallest meal calorie wise, because of the way my day is set up. Sleep is the last focus for the day. My greatest challenge here has been slowing down my mind enough to rest. My strategy consists of putting my phone down and turning on airplane mode, getting rid of all the white light and just leaving my salt lamp on while I reflect on my day. Once I generate my thoughts I journal and get all those thoughts on paper. This has really allowed me to fall asleep and once I’m out I’m out for the night. With a typical night being 8 hours. I don’t believe everyone needs 8 hours but it’s what works for me. Some people may need more or less.

 

5. Some (of many) similarities I see between us are your voracious reading habits and how up-to-date you are in the world of health. What trends do you see emerging? Are these good trends? Where should the academic sphere of health be directing its resources?

It’s been an incredible journey thus far. I think it’s our obligation to read and keep up with the steady flow of information. I don’t want to outsource my problems to someone else. I’d rather take the time to learn myself.

The trends I see coming are environmental awareness which the nutrition and holistic healing community are dovetailing off of. People are gaining interest in less medications and are looking for alternative routes to the failed health care system here in America. This has also brought about a spiritual shift as well. We’re connecting the mind, body and spirit instead of tearing them apart into separate entities. I think this is where the big yoga explosion and the legalization of cannabis are coming from and millennials aren’t interested in the old failed systems. We’re interested in progression and change for the most part. The age of information has opened the door to self healing and questioning of what’s really happening in health care. I think these are great trends and I am so excited to be a part of it.

Academia should be directing their focus on staying up to date with the latest evidence. But presenting it in a way the common man can benefit. Not manipulating information to benefit big corporations. The gap is in the presentation not the information. I don’t think we need more evidence at this point to prove that daily exercise, proper sleep, exposing yourself to sunlight and the outdoors, eating organic whole foods, drinking clean water and surrounding yourself in a loving community prevents illness and is required for the human body to thrive. These things are non negotiable. Yet its still so far from common knowledge.

My point here is: It’s simple. Let’s start with the basics and build from there to heal this planet and the human race. No magical discovery of a gene, medication, working at stressful job inside a cubicle, and separating ourselves from society is going to fix the problem. Vote with your dollar if you want change not on a ballot. Support your local farmers and small businesses.

 

6. If you had $1,000,000 to maximally improve the health of as many people as possible, what would you do?  

My dream is to be able to create a project for an annual immersion retreat similar to what Tony Robbins does, but make it very affordable to the common person that will focus on daily routine alteration. Teaching cooking, exercise and play, education series each day, nature immersion and connecting to the earth and your food, mindset development through self love and expression. There are many retreats like this going on now. I just feel as if they are all separate and not brought together as one complete piece. I know I can’t reach everyone, because people are ready when they’re ready. One of my favorite quotes is “when the student is ready the teacher will appear”- unknown.

 

7.  Do you have any closing thoughts? Where can people find more about you and what are your plans for the world of health and athleticism over the next year?

Ask questions and educate yourself everyday, create a filter of truth for yourself to view the world, never settle, love yourself, you’re beautiful in your own ways, be kind to others, get outside and play you’re never too old, eat real food and have fun. Being healthy is exciting not bland and boring.

I’m currently proposing to the school I work at to develop two strength training courses that will teach movement and nutrition to freshman and juniors for next school year. I also began my personal brand called the Alternative Fish which is a youtube channel, facebook and instagram page that will be for information on exactly the topics I covered here. I just started it so bare with me. Lots of posts to come!

Kyler Fisher youtube

Thanks for having me. Really looking forward to this collaboration.  

 

Holiday Season Nutrition

Posted on Updated on

cooked food on paper plates

As we settle in the holiday season, it seems like sweets tend to surround us with chocolate temptation and sugary savory cookies. Many folks tend to give in and engulf pounds of desserts over the course of the holiday season. The problem isn’t the sweets themselves, but self-control. Now, I’m not saying to stay away from all desserts or make claims that sugar is evil. If you want some sweets, go ahead! It comes down to self-control and serving sizes. To tell you all to not consume any sweets during Christmas is absurd and can surely ruin the night. It’s also completely understandable to want to stray from desserts because “you don’t want lose your gainz! Or all of your hard work will be a waste”. I can assure you, there is a way to enjoy the holiday season, maintain your gains, and still achieve your goals.

 

Reach for the Christmas cookies and have a handful. Do not feel guilty about this. Just don’t overdo it like a plate or two stacked with brownies, cookies, candy canes, etc. Now if you exercised that day, you have a little more leniency but still not much, keep it minimal. Here are some tips that may work for you:

  • Hungry? Go for a protein snack (Greek yogurt, beef jerky, hard-boiled eggs, protein smoothies, protein bars/cookies). Not the tastiest but better for body composition. How is it better? Protein is more satiating (feel full longer) and has a higher TEF (thermic effect of food), essentially burning more calories during metabolism.
  • Drink water! Sometimes hunger may be mistaken for thirst, so if you’re feeling hungry and want a snack, drink some water first then decide if you want to go for that snack. It may also help if you drink water before dinner. This may give you a “full” feeling thus, potentially leading to less food intake.
  • Same like the first tip, add more protein than anything on your dinner plate, i.e. chicken breast, turkey, beans, steak, roast beef, etc. Eat your protein first, then go for the mashed potatoes, etc.
  • Add fiber to your dish. Fiber also adds satiety. Examples include, broccoli, spinach, cauliflower, celery.
  • Use smaller plates. People tend to eat less with smaller plates. Try it out and see if it works. It may not but this is about experimenting.
  • Make substitutions. Choose a fruit cup with cottage cheese over a gingerbread cookies and hot chocolate. Choose wine over beer. Simple substitutions like this can help.
  • Most importantly, if you lose all self-control and go on a 3-week sweets binge, don’t worry, you will be okay. Enjoy the holiday season!

bake bakery baking candy

If looking to make healthier desserts, click here (no affiliation, just cool ideas).

 

If you’re interested to find out an individualized nutrition plan just for you, contact info@ruthlessperformance.com for our nutrition services.

Ruthless Performer Q&A – Elite Sports Nutrition with Jesse Rodriguez R.D.

Posted on Updated on

Today’s Q&A guest is our own sports nutritionist Jesse Rodriguez. Jesse has his own prolific history as a national-level swimmer for El Salvador and here in the United States competing in college and post-graduate for the University of Southern California. This all makes Jesse a world-class resource as not many people have competed at this level at any sport. With this background, plus his vast time spent in academia studying nutrition, interning with top sports teams, and the clinical work necessary for his Registered Dietitian status, we’re glad to have him on-board.

1. There are lots of people working with nutrition in some capacity, what sets you apart?

Firstly, I’m a licensed registered dietitian which means I went though extensive schooling and professional training. Secondly, I was an athlete for the majority of my life and I began studying/applying nutrition since I was 16. Lastly, I continue to read and study a lot! Mostly on clinical, biochemistry and sports nutrition research articles. Overall, I’ve been in this game for a long time and still aiming to be well-rounded in all elements of nutrition. (Editor’s Note: You read more about the difference between a Nutritionist and a Registered Dietitian here) 

2. Given your personal and prolific history as a swimmer, you’re uniquely qualified to critique high-level sports nutrition, particularly in swimming. What are athletes doing right with their diet? What are they doing wrong?

Nutrition in sports has gained more popularity over the years and many athletes found the benefits of fueling appropriately. I’ve noticed that more athletes know about nutrient timing, and the importance of including carbs as fuel and protein for recovery. I think that many athletes know how to fuel around training times but during other times (i.e. dinner at home or restaurant), they tend to lack in nutritional knowledge. A lot of athletes still eat junk food throughout the day, maybe because they feel they can get away with it or something, but that’s our job as sports dietitians to correct. Additionally, building the appropriate plate according to their goals (i.e. body composition, better recovery) seems to be a problem along with maintaining hydration. Here’s an article I’ve written on RuthlessPerformance.com on this is. 

3. Supplement must-do’s… What supplements (if any) are generally worth taking? What supplements are a scam?

Supplements for athletes typically aren’t necessary since athletes are eating more than the general population but it all depends on the athlete. Supplements would be necessary if an athlete is deficient in a nutrient like Iron or Vitamin D. Athletes following special diets like the vegan diet may need to supplement as well. As far as supplements for performance, the most studied and useful would be: Caffeine, Creatine, Beta-Alanine, Nitrates, and Sodium Bicarbonate (baking soda). It’s hard to say which supplements are a scam because they’re so many in the market and it can vary due to individual responses to them. With that being said, it’s important to make sure if you’re going to take supplements, that they’re 3rd party certified by organizations like the NSF.

4. You’ve gone pretty far in your journey through academia… With the emphasis of studies, objectivity, and research in academia there is still surprisingly lots of room for subjectivity and interpretations of results and outcomes. What are your thoughts on this? What can be done to fix or improve nutrition science?

Correct, I think there is always room for development in the field so it’s my job to follow along and stay up to date with the latest research. This for me is actually fun because I enjoy reading research papers and learning to new things. The science of nutrition can be very complex and as of now, I don’t have any solutions. I think that the correct messages (evidence-based results) need to be sent out to the general public so myths can be debunked. It’s more about nutrition education than anything at the moment.

5. From a more general standpoint, the headlines regarding nutrition are changing on a damn near daily basis. What elements of sports nutrition do you think are firmly established? What rules of nutrition have outlasted the scandalous and salacious headlines?

Hydration, nutrient timing, and recovery nutrition seems to be the foundation. There will always be a new thing that comes out, but those three are firmly established. Individualized nutrition is fundamental in sports nutrition and I think that will outlast any headline or diet (i.e keto diet, intermittent fasting, etc). I also think that sticking to the basics, such as nutrition from food rather than living off smoothies and supplements for example, will always have the edge. Of course, going back to supplements, this will depend on the individual’s status.

6. Where does sports nutrition go from here? What do you think we’ll be seeing in the coming years regarding nutrition? Gut health seems to be a hot topic as of late, what are your opinions on this? What should nutrition scientists place more emphasis on?

The basics of sports nutrition will remain the same and to be honest, I don’t see anything revolutionary coming soon. However, they’re new things coming along such as nutrigenomics and the importance of gut health, antioxidants, and periodizing nutrition which looks promising. Gut health has been popular lately and for good reason.  Because of the gut and brain connection, I feel it’s important to treat your gut right just like most want to treat their blood sugar levels right. I think emphasis should be placed on education and sending the correct messages to athletes and the public. Researchers are doing a great job in nutritional science but there hasn’t been anything lately that can change the whole world of nutrition and its effect on humanity. If we can do this, that will be the next revolutionary thing.

 

**Editor’s Note: Jesse will also be featured on ‘Healthy Habits with Dr. T’ on Wednesday, Oct. 17th at 7:00 PM EST, we’ll post all of the details for event pre-registration and where to view it on our Twitter and Instagram.**

 

Want to learn more about Jesse or our various nutritional programs and consultations? Fill out the form below to get started!

 

Ruthless Performer Q&A – Functional Medicine with Dr. Touchinsky

Posted on Updated on

This post marks the first in our new Ruthless Perfomer Q&A series. Throughout this series we’ll be talking with various health and fitness influencers regarding their specific niche and how it effects the world of health and wellnessa at-large.

Today we’re joined by Dr. Touchinsky who established Blue Mountain Family Chiropractic in 2005. His early focus was helping people suffering with pain and injuries utilizing hands on chiropractic care. Within the first few years of practice, he realized that many of the cases seen required more than just physical treatment. People were dealing with issues caused by poor diet, lack of exercise, inadequate sleep, and other lifestyle related factors. However, due to a variety of reasons, none of their health care providers were addressing these issues. This lead Dr. Touchinsky to study and become certified in Functional Medicine.

What is Functional Medicine and why is this something you’re so engaged in?

Conventional medicine usually seeks to identify a problem, an injury, or an illness.  Diagnosis and treatment of that diagnosis is their forte. They are the doctors of “what”.  They want to know what is wrong with you, and then they apply the treatment designed for that problem.

The best way to describe functional medicine practitioners is we are the doctors of “why”.  Why are you sick? Why do you have an autoimmune disease? Why do you have chronic fatigue?  This “why” can vary… it may be poor gut health due to frequent use of antibiotics in the past, or nutrient deficiencies due to an inadequate diet, or excessive stress from work, overtraining in the gym, or lack of proper sleep and recovery.  The “why” can vary from person to person so we look at each individual’s “why” so we can develop a plan for that person and not their disease.

Teach us something… What is something within health that you think many physically active, healthy individuals may be ignorant to (i.e. I am always sure to teach clients about the relationship between the lymphatic and muscular system)?

Gut health is supreme.  “You are what you eat” is a common saying.  However, it’s not that simple. It’s what we eat, digest, assimilate, and excrete.  Our digestive system helps manage what our body takes in to help build muscle, health and repair all sorts of tissues including our vital organs, make neurochemical and hormones, etc.  It also helps us get rid of the toxic by products of doing all of that. It’s both the fuel injector system and the exhaust system. If the gut is chronically inflamed it’s going to affect nutrient absorption. If there’s constipation, it’s like plugging up the exhaust pipe in your car or the chimney in your house.  This affects health more than most people realize.

If you doubt that or this is a new concept to you, google “gut” and <insert health problem or disease name here> and take a look at what shows  up.

What do you think is the easiest thing individuals already engaged in a fitness program can change about their daily routine to further improve their health?

Most people can benefit from eating less meals per day and eating within a 12 hour time period per day, with earlier being better.  An example might be at 7am, 11am-1pm, and 5pm-7pm. Eating food disrupts normal equilibrium and places the body under stress. It’s a necessary function, but triggering that stress every few hours is not good. It’s beneficial to give the body plenty of time between our meals and then one long period per day of 12 hrs or more.   There even some interesting research showing that more than 12 hours can be even more of an advantage. This is called intermittent fasting or time restricted feeding. This can be taken even a step further by doing full water fasting or a Fasting Mimicking Diet on occasion. For more information on that, search for fasting and Dr. Valter Longo.  

As someone within the field, what do you think about the current state of chiropractic care? What are some common myths or concerns that you come across regularly? Are these concerns warranted?

Chiropractors practice methods that are the most effective means of addressing muscle, joint, and many nerve issues in my opinion.  We have extensive training and spend our career seeing people with injuries and pain. Not only are we trained in treating these issues, but diagnosing them as well. This makes us a great first option when someone has something wrong.  If it turns out it’s a more serious issue that requires a surgeon, or if there’s doubt and more testing needs to be done, we can refer or order testing such as blood tests, MRIs, and CT scans. Most of the time we can start treating immediately and begin providing patients relief on day one.

Some common myths that I see are we only treat the spine.  That might be how we got our start over 100 years ago, but we now are trained on evaluating and treating a wide variety of issues.  We’re not just “bone setters” either. I work just as much on the muscles as I do the bones and joints. Another common myth is that once you start going, you have to keep on going.  There may be some cases of permanent injuries or those that have very demanding jobs where it makes sense to see someone once every few months to keep them in good shape, but in most cases my goal is to get the person out of pain, show them what they can do for themselves to prevent the problem from recurring, and then discharge them from care.

Most forward-thinking individuals working in healthcare admit it’s a rather flawed system. What do you think is the most troubling aspect of modern healthcare in America? What do you think is the easiest problem within healthcare to fix?

It’s a very flawed system.  Health insurance dictates care and most providers end up treating to the insurance.  Insurance payment to providers is based on what is done to a patient. It’s procedural based.  That means that the more “stuff” that we do to patients, the more we bill, and the more we get paid. If you do less “stuff”, you get less payment.  This only promotes overutilization of certain services. Additionally, an officer visit where your doctor diagnoses a common cold gets paid the same as a visit where they diagnose and (attempts to) manage diabetes.  The latter is way more complicated and requires much more attention and expertise to handle. I could really go on and on, but I’ll leave it at that.

pasted image 0The easiest problem to fix is to take away the middleman. Take away insurance.  That sounds horrible because it’s the only way most people can afford to see a doctor, but by taking away the middle man we would lower the costs for everyone.  If people had to pay for everything out of pocket (at least up front), then they would help, along with the doctor, if a procedure or test is really necessary. If you doubt this, ask any provider, “do you tend to order more testing on people with or without insurance?”   For those that truly can’t afford care, we can take the money we use to subsidize health insurance and set up free and reduced clinics. At least this would put money directly into communities and building facilities and paying providers, vs. sitting in the coffers of insurance companies to selectively dole out as they wish.

blue mountain family chiropractic

 

**Editor’s Note: John Matulevich of Ruthless Performance will be appearing on Dr. Touchinsky’s Podcast “Healthy Habits with Dr. T” this wednesday night. You can preregister to listen to the podcast at the address here or watch it live on facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/doctortouchinsky/ **

Building a plate

Posted on Updated on

HEPApr2013Making small changes will lead to bigger results. Start off with behavioral changes before jumping on to the new diet out there. This means things like eating on a smaller plate, removing the salt from the table, reducing serving sizes, etc.

myplate_blueIn general, a “healthy” or “healthier” plate should include a protein, whole grain, complex carbs (veggies/fruit), healthy fat (olive oil or avocado), and hydration (milk/water). USDA has come up with an image of what a healthy plate should look like. This is very general since protein can be a hot dog, or whole milk as dairy, which contains a lot of fat.

Harvard health dissected the USDA plate and made a detailed version. They included healthy fat, along with extra details, which is important to our health. Read our “Why do we need fats in our diet?” 

download

Both plates are for the general public and used for weight maintenance. For athletes and those looking for a specific body composition goal (weight loss, weight gain, etc.) building a plate becomes more tailored to this individuals’ goals. The healthy plate provides a foundation of what should be on a plate, but macro-nutrient distribution would be manipulated according to the individual’s needs. US Olympic Committee has made three fuel plates that targeted for the athlete’s training. Still not very specific because everyone is different but effective.

If you’re looking to make nutrition changes in your life, start with small modifications then gradually transition into a detailed plan.

By Jesse Rodriguez, RD, CSCS

 

If you’re interested to find out an individualized nutrition plan just for you, contact info@ruthlessperformance for our nutrition services.

 

 

Does Caffeine Have Any Effect On Resistance Exercise?

Posted on Updated on

Many gym-goers are looking for ways to get more work in during their training sessions. Some turn to pre-workout supplements while others may turn to steroid-related drugs. Although pre-workout supplements contain caffeine, it’s also filled with unnecessary and potentially dangerous substances.

Caffeine on resistance training has been long looked at with supportive research data on its effect. Caffeine’s major effect for training is that it reduces pain perception, potentially delaying fatigue during exercise.  Additionally, caffeine may also reduce RPE (rate of perceived exertion) which may extend duration and/or intensity of workouts.

Sources could come as either coffee or caffeine powder/pills. The most important information to know is that 3-6mg/kg may be the optimal range to see effects or a dose of approximately 200mg 1 hour before exercise. 2-3 cups of coffee may be the optimal dose; however, caffeine content depends on the type of coffee and if any espresso shots are added. Experiment with doses and types and find the right amount to see individualized results.

six white ceramic mugs

Anne, M. (2018, May 16). How Many Milligrams of Caffeine Are in a Cup of Coffee? Retrieved from https://www.livestrong.com/article/260763-how-many-milligrams-of-caffeine-are-in-a-cup-of-coffee/

Diego B. Souza, Michael Duncan, and Marcos D. Polito. Acute Caffeine Intake Improves Lower Body Resistance Exercise Performance with Blood Flow Restriction. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance 0 0:0, 1-22

Michael J. Duncan, Michelle Stanley, Natalie Parkhouse, Kathryn Cook, Mike Smith. Acute caffeine ingestion enhances strength performance and reduces perceived exertion and muscle pain perception during resistance exercise. Eur J Sport Sci. 2013; 13(4): 392–399. Published online 2011 Dec 5. doi: 10.1080/17461391.2011.635811

Wolde, Tsedeke. (2014). Effects of caffeine on health and nutrition: A Review. 30.

By Jesse Rodriguez, RD, CSCS

A Comparison Of Several Sports Drinks

Posted on Updated on

Electrolytes consist of sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate. Workouts lasting less than 1 hour typically only need to re-hydrate with water but for workouts >1 hour, require liquids with a combination of carbohydrates and electrolytes.  Electrolytes are needed because they are, along with water, are lost through sweat which is the bodies primary way of preventing excessive rises in body temperature aka hyperthermia, especially in the heat. Performance is impaired when approximately 2% of body weight is dehydrated.

Many electrolyte products are out there in market. There is no absolute best one, but some may be better than others. This may also depend on the individual and their response to them. Scratch labs sells hydration mixes to be made into a sports drink. Then there are the traditional sports drinks such as Gatorade and PowerAde. What makes these drinks different? Let’s take a look…

 

Drink

Calories Carbs (g) Sodium (mg)  Potassium (mg) Other
Scratch labs

Hydration Mix 1 scoop

80 21 380

39

Calcium & magnesium
Gatorade

1 bottle (591mL)

150 38 250 65 Citric acid & gum
PowerAde

1 bottle (360mL)

80 21 150 35 High fructose corn syrup, & B-vitamins
The Right Stuff

1 pouch

0 0 1780 0

Chloride & Citrate

PowerAde and Gatorade contain a lot of added sugars with artificial colors as well. The problem is that too much added carbs decreases the amount of water that can be absorbed (Jeukendrup & Gleeson, 2004). Only small amounts of glucose and sodium are needed so that water absorption rate increases. The right stuff is primarily electrolyte containing with no energy (calories) and carbs however, it can be mixed with a carb containing drink thus increasing carbs and/or electrolytes which may slow absorption of water. Scratch labs hydration mix is similar to PowerAde as far as electrolyte content. Scratch labs hydration mix can also be mixed with a carb liquid but the mix alone may just be sufficient. Overall, Scratch labs seems like it has a good mix to be used during and after exercise lasting more than 1 hour.scratch

Jeukendrup, Asker & Gleeson, Michael. Sports Nutrition. An Introduction to Energy Production and Performance. 2004.

Gropper, Sareen S., Smith, L. Jack., & Carr, Timothy P. Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism. Seventh edition. 2016.

By Jesse Rodriguez, RD, CSCS

 

 

 

 

What is the Difference Between a Nutritionist and a Registered Dietitian?

Posted on

Registered Dietitians are licensed nutritional professionals with an undergraduate degree and supervised practice hours. Among completion, a national exam must be taken to be officially licensed and practice as a professional. Registered dietitians are recognized by The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics with mandatory completion of CEUs (Continuing Education Units) to maintain registration.

adult agriculture asian commerce

The term “Nutritionist” does not require extensive school and professional training. Essentially, anyone can call themselves a nutritionist because they read a few books. That is not to say nutritionist don’t know what they’re talking about but nutritionists can’t assess, diagnosis, or treat nutritional-related problems where as a Registered Dietitian can.
At Ruthless performance, we offer nutritional services by a Licensed Registered Dietitian.

It’s simple: All Dietitians are nutritionists, but not all nutritionists are Dietitians.

 

 

By Jesse Rodriguez, RD, CSCS

Ruthless Performance Guide to Mineral Supplementation

Posted on

Previously, we talked about the importance and effect of vitamins in performance. We now move on to minerals. Fundamentally, minerals are broken into different categories based on their function; Major, Trace and Ultra-trace minerals. Despite the fact that minerals only contribute only about ~4% of total body weight, their functions are vital for cellular activity, energy metabolism, osmotic properties of body fluids and contribution to teeth and bones.

IMG_0797
This mineral supplement is a Ruthless Performance favorite and available for sale at Healthy Habits Natural Market in Orwigsburg, PA.

The major minerals include calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, sodium and chloride. Major minerals are found in greater amounts in the body requiring ~100mg/day by adults. Moreover, sodium, chloride, and potassium are the minerals that regulate electrolyte balance.

Trace minerals are called trace because they needed by small amounts in the body, less than 100mg/day. In addition, if amounts required are less than 1mg/day, they are called Ultra-trace minerals. Trace minerals include Iron, Zinc, Copper, Fluoride, and Manganese while Ultra-trace minerals include Selenium, Iodine, Molybdenum and Chromium.

*Note other Trace and Ultra-trace minerals will not be discussed because not much is known about the need for them by the body.

Discussed will be the most common minerals utilized in athletic performance. Minerals in the body act as cofactors which are need during metabolism and for other bodily functions such transport of molecules. Some minerals are useful during performance while the rest are needed for overall health, but make no mistake, their role in the body is crucial for all of us. The chart below outlines common minerals used for performance, and its major function, role, etc.

Mineral Chart

 

In summary, chromium and zinc are the two most important minerals in glucose metabolism therefore making these minerals essential in our diets, especially in athletes. Magnesium is of importance because of its function in protein and fatty acid synthesis and 300 other enzymatic reactions. However, too much intake of magnesium will decrease absorption of phosphorus, an essential mineral. The electrolytes are obviously crucial in athletic performance so adequate amounts must be consumed pre, during, and post-workouts. If you’re eating a well-balanced diet, then mineral supplementation may not be necessary but a waste of money. For example, like mentioned above, if you supplement with magnesium in large doses (>600mg) then absorption of phosphorus declines about 50%. Furthermore, your body may not absorb all the mineral content so it’s just gets urinated along with your money. Another example would be too much Zinc causing a deficiency in copper or iron, both important for our health. Eat a well-balanced diet and keep training hard.

IMG_0799

Gropper S. Sareen, Smith L. Jack, Carr P. Timothy. Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism. 7th Edition. 2016

 

By Jesse Rodriguez

Jesse’s focus and emphasis is on Sports Nutrition. He holds a bachelor’s degree in Nutritional Science with the addition of a CSCS certification from the NSCA. Jesse swam for the El Salvador National Team and competed at the international level. Jesse has worked at USC with the Strength and Conditioning program and UCLA as the lead intern for Sports Nutrition. He is currently a dietetic intern to complete requirements for the Registered Dietitian exam and obtain his professional license. During his free time, Jesse continues to strength train, Olympic lift, and stay up-to-date on the latest nutrition trends. Lastly, Jesse is a member of the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics, National Strength and Conditioning Association, and Collegiate & Professional Sports Dietitians Association.

 

A Quick Guide to Hydration for Performance

Posted on Updated on

The weather is warming up which means dehydration sets in faster. Dehydration has major effects on the body such as electrolyte imbalances, cramping, headaches, and reduced athletic performance, potentially leading to heat stroke and even death. Dehydration varies widely amongst individuals based on their hydration status prior to training, practice gear body composition, type of training, and an individual’s heat acclimation.  Therefore, rehydration should be tailored to one’s specific hydration status either pre, during, or post-workout. If you’re feeling bold, here is a formula from the NSCA to determine your sweat rate:

 

  • Step 1. Weigh yourself naked before exercise (e.g., 180 lb).
  • Step 2. Exercise for 1 hour (drink normally during exercise but avoid eating) and track your fluid intake (e.g., 4 oz)
  • Step 3. Weigh yourself naked post-exercise (e.g., 178.5 lb).
  • Step 4. To calculate your sweat rate simply subtract your post-exercise weight from your pre-exercise weight then add the weight/volume of any fluids you consumed.

 

Example

180 lb (pre-exercise) – 178.5 lb (post-exercise) = 1.5 lb (sweat loss) + 4 oz (fluids consumed during exercise) (0.25 lb) = 1.75 lb of sweat lost per hour

 

Knowing your sweat loss can give you an idea how much water should be replaced but most importantly it can be indicator of heat acclimation. Training in hot environments can lead to adaptation thus potentially resulting in a decline in sweat loss. A simple and effective way to check to hydration status is by the color of urine. An easy way to remember is by distinguishing two colors; Apple juice color (urine) = dehydrated, Lemonade color (urine) = hydrated.

 

Here some general quick tips for proper hydration:

 

  • Before workout, check the color of urine. If dehydrated drink, until the color of Hydration Statusurine looks like lemonade.
  • If workouts are less than 1hr, water is sufficient. Recommendations are 3–8 oz. every 15–20 minutes (a gulp is about 1–2 oz.)
  • If workouts are more than 1hr, you should drink liquids with the combination of carbs + electrolytes, 3-8 oz. every 15-20 minutes.
    • Note: Fluids may vary depending on intensity of temperature, altitude, and/or humidity.
  • After workouts, weigh yourself and for every 1lb lost, rehydrate with 16-24 oz. of water.
  • More than a 2% weight loss post workout indicates dehydration so replenish soon.
  • Its key to make sure you are replacing not only water, but sodium from sweat loss.
  • Its recommended to rehydrate with a carb + electrolyte drink.
  • Continue to check hydration status with the color of your urine.

 

By Jesse Rodriguez

Jesse’s focus and emphasis is on Sports Nutrition. He holds a bachelor’s degree in Nutritional Science with the addition of a CSCS certification from the NSCA. Jesse swam for the El Salvador National Team and competed at the international level. Jesse has worked at USC with the Strength and Conditioning program and UCLA as the lead intern for Sports Nutrition. He is currently a dietetic intern to complete requirements for the Registered Dietitian exam and obtain his professional license. During his free time, Jesse continues to strength train, Olympic lift, and stay up-to-date on the latest nutrition trends. Lastly, Jesse is a member of the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics, National Strength and Conditioning Association, and Collegiate & Professional Sports Dietitians Association.

Nina S. Stachenfeld, PhD. Assessing hydration in the laboratory and field. February 2013. http://www.gssiweb.org/en/sports-science-exchange/article/sse-111-assessing-hydration-in-the-laboratory-and-field#articleTopic_1
https://www.nsca.com/education/articles/trainer-tips/hydration/
https://www.hprc-online.org/articles/hydration-basics