probiotics

Featured Fitness Content: Volume 42

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View the last edition of ‘Featured Fitness Content’ here.

Personal Training, Coaching, and Strength & Conditioning

What is DOMS and How Do You Deal With It? via COR

Beyond Mastery: Kettlebell Flow Workout  By Karen Smith via Girls Gone Strong

Restore Your Breathing and Improve Your Conditioning via Diesel Strength

Coaching art & science  By Vern Gambetta via HMMR Media

 

Weight Loss, Nutrition, and General Health

Could you be developing an autoimmune disease? By Buddy Touchinsky

The Hidden, Unspoken Dangers About Oral Contraceptives By Justin Janoska via Metabolic Effect

Does “low carb” have an official definition? By Kamal Patel via Examine

 

Strength Training, Powerlifting, and Bodybuilding

The Deadlift: 3 Reasons By Mark Rippetoe via Starting Strength

Tip: Movement Prep for Olympic Lifting By Wil Fleming via T-Nation

Tip: How to Bring Up a Weak Body Part By John Meadows T-Nation

 

Motivation, Business, and Success

Why The Easy Life Breeds Weakness In AND Out of The Gym By Zach Even Esh

6 Things Entrepreneurship Can Teach You About Fitness  By Mark Fisher via Mark Fisher Fitness

Discounts vs. Packages in Your Cash Practice By Aaron LeBauer via The OMPT

Seeing and believing By Seth Godin

3 Ways to Improve Your Customer Service, Starting Today  By Michael Keeler

 

Physical Therapy, Alignment, and Injury Prevention

Life Lessons I Learned from My Physical Therapist  By Stella Kaufman via Mark Fisher Fitness

 

Research

Can supplemental vitamin D improve sleep? By Kamal Patel via Examine

Do high-carbohydrate diets increase the risk of death?  By Kamal Patel via Examine

What I Learned About Injury Rates from Surveying 1,900 Powerlifters By Andrew Patton via Stronger by Science

 

Ruthless Performance Coaches’ Content

Why Ruthless Performance Doesn’t Emphasize Energy System Training for Our Swimmers By John Matulevich via Ruthless Performance

Featured Fitness Content: Volume 41

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View the last edition of ‘Featured Fitness Content’ here.

Personal Training, Coaching, and Strength & Conditioning

The Complete Guide to Dynamic Swimming Warm-up for Swimmers via COR

Reverse Engineering The Plank By Charlie Weingroff

 

Weight Loss, Nutrition, and General Health

The surprising truth about sugar.  By Brian St. Pierre & Krista Scott-Dixon via Precision Nutrition

Artificial sweeteners fail dieters; cause health risks By Buddy Touchinsky

Hack Your Mood & Optimize Your Sleep By Ben House via Onnit Academy

5 Life-Changing Nutrition Tips for New Moms By Jesse Mundell via Girls Gone Strong

 

Strength Training, Powerlifting, and Bodybuilding

So You Say People Who Don’t Squat or Deadlift will End Up Broken…  By Lee Boyce

5 Keys to Training Success By Mike Robertson

 

Motivation, Business, and Success

Getting More Dream Clients By Being More Who You Really Are  By Mark Fisher via Business for Unicorns

Four Apps That Improve My Business and Lower My Stress  By Michael Keeler via Business for Unicorns

 

Physical Therapy, Alignment, and Injury Prevention

A Better Way to Mobilize the Wrist  By Erson Religioso

How to Spot and Correct Hamstring Tightness By Brent Frayser via COR

Why Serratus Anterior Matters  With Eric Cressey

 

Research

Science Is Self-Correcting – The Case Of The Hip Thrust And Its Effects On Speed By Bret Contreras

Do probiotics improve quality of life in seasonal allergies? By Kamal Patel via Examine

21 of the best arguments for and against coconut oil  By Kamal Patel via Examine

 

Featured Fitness Content: Volume 39

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View last week’s edition of ‘Featured Fitness Content’ here.

Personal Training, Coaching, and Strength & Conditioning

Interview with Lee Taft on Coaching Agility, Speed and Athletic Movement By Joel Smith with Lee Taft

Why I Don’t Like Scap Push-ups By Eric Cressey

 

Weight Loss, Nutrition, and General Health

How Much Cardio Do You Need To Get Ripped For Summer?  By Sean Hyson via Onnit Academy

A Really Bad Long Term Strategy for Weight Loss By Mike Roussell

Doctors should emphasize exercise, not weight loss By Buddy Touchinsky

 

Strength Training, Powerlifting, and Bodybuilding

8 Mobility Moves For Better Squatting, Pressing, and Pulling By Mark DiSalvo via Onnit Academy

7 Tips for a Bigger Bench  By Bret Contreras

3 Ways to Reduce Stress and Improve Recovery During Your Next Workout By Harold Gibbons via Mark Fisher Fitness

28 Years of Lifting: Strength Training In Your 40s & Training As You Get Older By Zach Even Esh

 

Motivation, Business, and Success

5 Powerful Life Lessons From the Book Tools of Titans by Tim Ferriss By Liam Seed via Addicted 2 Success

How To *Not* Be A Spineless Leader By Tim Denning via Addicted 2 Success

How to Build a Fitness Practice that Brings You Joy  By Elizabeth Stacey via Mark Fisher Fitness

Waking up to life By Kim Lloyd

 

Physical Therapy, Alignment, and Injury Prevention

6 Hip Mobility Drills Everyone Should Perform By Mike Reinold

[VIDEO] Communicating with Docs, PTs working as Strength Coaches & Essential Reading for Students With Mike Reinold

Stretching Isn’t Bullshit  By Jasper De Coninck via Dean Somerset

 

Research

Fact check: Is boxed macaroni and cheese actually toxic?  By Kamal Patel via Examine

 

Ruthless Performance Coaches’ Content

Why Do We Need Fats in Our Diet? By Jesse Rodriguez

Why Do We Need Fats in Our Diet?

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Fat is a more concentrated source of dietary energy than carbohydrate and protein.  Fats concentrated source of energy is about 9 kcal/g (carbohydrates and proteins provide only about 4 kcal/g). Fatty acids from meat and dairy products are relatively saturated. Fatty acids from plant sources are generally more unsaturated. Then there are essential fatty acids (needed from diet) such as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA’s) – omega-6 (linoleic acid) and omega-3 (alpha linolenic acid) fatty acids.

  • Omega – 3 (grain, fresh fruits, veggies, fish, olive oil, garlic, wine) – help reduce inflammation, highly concentrated in the brain
  • Omega – 6 (meat based, vegetable oil) – promote inflammation

 

We need fats because of its good source of metabolic energy (carbon oxidation) and its preferred choice of energy storing (2 to 3 weeks’ storage). Fats also plays many roles in body making it essential for health and wellness. Some roles include:

  • Increased absorption of Fat-Soluble Vitamins (A, D, E, K) – Vitamin E also playing a role as antioxidant.
  • Formation of steroids such as:
  • Cholesterol, the most abundant steroid in the body, is widely distributed in all cells and serves as a major membrane component
  • Bile salts aid in the digestion of fats
  • Ergosterol, a yeast steroid, is converted to vitamin D by ultraviolet radiation
  • Adrenal cortex hormones – involved in metabolism
  • Sex hormones – testosterone, estrogen, and progesterone
  • Anti-inflammatory properties – aiding in recovery
  • Efficient energy source in long duration exercises such as marathons/triathlons.

 

Fat gets a bad rap but it is crucial for our health. It is true that fat can be harmful for our bodies if excessively consumed, especially by trans fatty acids and hydrogenated oils – think chips, donuts, fried foods, etc. The Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) recommends that between 20 percent and 35 percent of calories should come from dietary fat. Include a variety of different fats and oils into your diet for optimum health. Incorporate plant based fats for added benefits such as walnuts, peanuts, almonds, chia seeds, hemp seeds which promote anti-inflammatory properties.

 

 

References

Gropper S. Sareen and Smith L. Jack, Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism (7th edition)

http://www.eatrightpro.org/resource/media/press-releases/positions-and-issues/updated-academy-position-amount-and-types-of-fat-we-eat-affect-health-and-risk-of-disease

 

By Jesse Rodriguez

Jesse’s focus and emphasis is on Sports Nutrition. He holds a bachelor’s degree in Nutritional Science with the addition of a CSCS certification from the NSCA. Jesse swam for the El Salvador National Team and competed at the international level. Jesse has worked at USC with the Strength and Conditioning program and UCLA as the lead intern for Sports Nutrition. He is currently a dietetic intern to complete requirements for the Registered Dietitian exam and obtain his professional license. During his free time, Jesse continues to strength train, Olympic lift, and stay up-to-date on the latest nutrition trends. Lastly, Jesse is a member of the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics, National Strength and Conditioning Association, and Collegiate & Professional Sports Dietitians Association.

Featured Fitness Content: Volume 38

Posted on Updated on

View last week’s edition of ‘Featured Fitness Content’ here.

Personal Training, Coaching, and Strength & Conditioning

Building Impressive Strength After 50 By Bret Contreras

How to Guarantee You’ll Have a Hard Time Getting Clients Results By Tony Gentilcore

The Concept of Lowest System Load By Charlie Weingroff

Sudden Speed for Volleyball  By Ty Terrell via IFAST

 

Weight Loss, Nutrition, and General Health

Managing the stress of trying to get fitter: part 1 By Joy Victoria

A Really Bad Long Term Strategy for Weight Loss By Mike Roussell

Ask the Diet Doctor: Hangover Cures  By Mike Roussell via Shape

Perfecting Protein Intake in Athletes: How Much, What, and When? By Jorn Trommelen via Stronger By Science

Sleep, Hunger, Mood, Energy & Cravings (SHMEC): Is Your SHMEC in Check? By Jade Teta via Metabolic Effect

Detoxing, ReToxing, or Always-Toxing By Keoni Teta via Metabolic Effect

 

Strength Training, Powerlifting, and Bodybuilding

7 Tips For A Bigger Bench By Bret Contreras

Reverse Engineering The Plank By Charlie Weingroff

 

Motivation, Business, and Success

A case study on leveraging your assets to get shit done By Sol Orwell

Fitness Industry Survival Tips By Travis Hansen via Tony Gentilcore

15 Essentials to Creating a Trust-Boosting YouTube Profile Page By Neil Patel via QuickSprout

 

Physical Therapy, Alignment, and Injury Prevention

How to Train Around a Groin Strain By Samuel Spinelli via Tony Gentilcore

Who Gets the Best Care? Erson Religioso

Training with Biceps Tendinopathy  By Jason Eure via Stronger By Science

Research

Omega 3 Fatty Acids, Blood Flow and Cognition By Michael Jurgelewicz via Strength Sensei

Periodization Preview By Greg Nuckols

 

Ruthless Performance Coaches’ Content

[RP Exclusive] Effects of Alcohol on Performance By Daniel Goebel

[RP EXCLUSIVE] Top 5 Foods for Recovery By Jesse Rodriguez

Featured Fitness Content: Volume 36

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**Editor’s Note: Since The Fitness Resource merged with Ruthless Performance, we will be continuing TFR’s ‘Featured Fitness Content’ on our site. Be sure to subscribe to get the best content in health, fitness, and human performance delivered to your inbox every week.**

Personal Training, Coaching, and Strength & Conditioning

Considerations for Masters Lifters Via Juggernaut Training Systems

The Fallacies That Dominate Youth Athletic Training  Via Breaking Muscle

Do You Know What Your Core Really Is And What It Does? Via Breaking Muscle

The “Crowd” Wants Sets & Reps But Coaching MUST Go BEYOND Sets & Reps By Zach Even Esh

Fastpitch Friday Ep.28 Strategies to Avoid Low Back Pain for the Trap Bar Deadlift By Nancy Newell

 

Weight Loss, Nutrition, and General Health

Why Liver Is a Nutrient-Dense Superfood By Alexandra Rowles via Authority Nutrition

10 Health Benefits of Tart Cherry Juice By Alina Petre via Authority Nutrition

 

Strength Training, Powerlifting, and Bodybuilding

[VIDEO] Maximizing the Deadlift Warm-Up By Dr. Quinn Henoch via Juggernaut Training Systems

Step Up Your Glute Game With This Goblet Variation By Meghan Callaway

Busting the High Bar vs. Low Bar Squat Myth By John Rusin

Train Harder & Recover Faster with Concentric Only Training By Justin Ochoa via Dean Somerset

Strength Training Methods for Distance Runners via HMMR Media

This Is The Single Responsibility of Your Core Muscles By Harold Gibbons

 

Motivation, Business, and Success

The Biggest Problem For Personal Trainers By Michael Keeler via Business for Unicorns

45 Lessons I’ve Learned Along The Way… By Pat Rigsby

MF’s 15 Business Principles By Mark Fisher via Business for Unicorns

5 Ways To Consistently Finish Anything You Start By Denise Damijo via Addicted 2 Success

 

Physical Therapy, Alignment, and Injury Prevention

Improving Shoulder Motion: Lat Inhibition By Dr. Quinn Henoch via Juggernaut Training Systems

Cossack Squats: Breaking Out of the Sagittal Plane By Dean Somerset

 

Research

Low-carbing for endurance: the oxygen problem By Kamal Patel via Examine

Does diet soda cause strokes and dementia? By Kamal Patel via Examine

 

Ruthless Performance Coaches’ Content

Managing Post-Workout Hunger By Jesse Rodriguez

 

Managing Post-Workout Hunger

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Of the various hormones in the human body, there are two hormones whose primary responsibility is regulating hunger, these are:

  • Ghrelin – Which signals that you’re hungry
  • Leptin – Which signals that you’re full

Some people are hungry after a workout while some are not. Typically, hunger won’t kick in until a few hours or so but there are several factors that can cause hunger in these situations. Here are some reasons why you’re hungry and how it can be fixed.

Not eating enough before workout

It’s common for some individuals to fast before a workout in order to achieve weight loss. However, by going this route, one is could end up going a good number of hours without any fuel. As a result, one is going to experience mild to severe hunger after workout.

Fix this by fueling with a small high energy snack or combine with protein depending on your goal.

Some ideas include:

  • Apple sauce
  • Energy gel
  • Piece of fruit
  • Energy chews
  • Carb + protein (liquid)

Not drinking enough fluids

Staying hydrated is imperative for performance but many don’t hydrate properly. At times, one may feel hungry but it can be mistaken for thirst, so don’t be afraid to drink a cup of water. During more intense workouts or workouts lasting longer than 1 hour, a sports drink is suggested. Coming into a workout dehydrated or relatively close to it, ghrelin will kick in telling you that you’re hungry during and/or after workout.

  • Weigh yourself before and after workouts – For every 1lb lost, drink 16-24 oz. of water.

 

Excess Post-Oxygen Consumption (EPOC)

EPOC is the oxygen uptake above resting values used to restore the body to the pre-exercise condition.  Some of the elements during EPOC are the re-synthesis of ATP, glycogen, protein and restoration of oxygen levels. These elements are refueled from nutrition. After workouts, our energy substrates are low which causes a need for refuel leading to hunger.

 

 

Baechle Thomas R., Earle Roger W., Essentials of strength and conditioning, National Strength and Conditioning Association; Third edition.

https://www.acefitness.org/blog/5008/7-things-to-know-about-excess-post-exercise-oxygen

https://www.ncaa.org/sites/default/files/Performance%20Hydration%20Fact%20Sheet.pdf

 

By Jesse Rodriguez

Jesse is a nutritional science major with an emphasis in sports nutrition. Jesse swam for the El Salvador national team and competed at the international level. Jesse is currently working towards a CSCS and registered dietitian license. He currently works at UCLA as a sports nutrition intern assisting both dietitians with meal plans, body composition, and education materials. Jesse is a member of the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics and Collegiate & Professional Sports Dietitians Association.