probiotics

Featured Fitness Content: Volume 36

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**Editor’s Note: Since The Fitness Resource merged with Ruthless Performance, we will be continuing TFR’s ‘Featured Fitness Content’ on our site. Be sure to subscribe to get the best content in health, fitness, and human performance delivered to your inbox every week.**

Personal Training, Coaching, and Strength & Conditioning

Considerations for Masters Lifters Via Juggernaut Training Systems

The Fallacies That Dominate Youth Athletic Training  Via Breaking Muscle

Do You Know What Your Core Really Is And What It Does? Via Breaking Muscle

The “Crowd” Wants Sets & Reps But Coaching MUST Go BEYOND Sets & Reps By Zach Even Esh

Fastpitch Friday Ep.28 Strategies to Avoid Low Back Pain for the Trap Bar Deadlift By Nancy Newell

 

Weight Loss, Nutrition, and General Health

Why Liver Is a Nutrient-Dense Superfood By Alexandra Rowles via Authority Nutrition

10 Health Benefits of Tart Cherry Juice By Alina Petre via Authority Nutrition

 

Strength Training, Powerlifting, and Bodybuilding

[VIDEO] Maximizing the Deadlift Warm-Up By Dr. Quinn Henoch via Juggernaut Training Systems

Step Up Your Glute Game With This Goblet Variation By Meghan Callaway

Busting the High Bar vs. Low Bar Squat Myth By John Rusin

Train Harder & Recover Faster with Concentric Only Training By Justin Ochoa via Dean Somerset

Strength Training Methods for Distance Runners via HMMR Media

This Is The Single Responsibility of Your Core Muscles By Harold Gibbons

 

Motivation, Business, and Success

The Biggest Problem For Personal Trainers By Michael Keeler via Business for Unicorns

45 Lessons I’ve Learned Along The Way… By Pat Rigsby

MF’s 15 Business Principles By Mark Fisher via Business for Unicorns

5 Ways To Consistently Finish Anything You Start By Denise Damijo via Addicted 2 Success

 

Physical Therapy, Alignment, and Injury Prevention

Improving Shoulder Motion: Lat Inhibition By Dr. Quinn Henoch via Juggernaut Training Systems

Cossack Squats: Breaking Out of the Sagittal Plane By Dean Somerset

 

Research

Low-carbing for endurance: the oxygen problem By Kamal Patel via Examine

Does diet soda cause strokes and dementia? By Kamal Patel via Examine

 

Ruthless Performance Coaches’ Content

Managing Post-Workout Hunger By Jesse Rodriguez

 

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Managing Post-Workout Hunger

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Of the various hormones in the human body, there are two hormones whose primary responsibility is regulating hunger, these are:

  • Ghrelin – Which signals that you’re hungry
  • Leptin – Which signals that you’re full

Some people are hungry after a workout while some are not. Typically, hunger won’t kick in until a few hours or so but there are several factors that can cause hunger in these situations. Here are some reasons why you’re hungry and how it can be fixed.

Not eating enough before workout

It’s common for some individuals to fast before a workout in order to achieve weight loss. However, by going this route, one is could end up going a good number of hours without any fuel. As a result, one is going to experience mild to severe hunger after workout.

Fix this by fueling with a small high energy snack or combine with protein depending on your goal.

Some ideas include:

  • Apple sauce
  • Energy gel
  • Piece of fruit
  • Energy chews
  • Carb + protein (liquid)

Not drinking enough fluids

Staying hydrated is imperative for performance but many don’t hydrate properly. At times, one may feel hungry but it can be mistaken for thirst, so don’t be afraid to drink a cup of water. During more intense workouts or workouts lasting longer than 1 hour, a sports drink is suggested. Coming into a workout dehydrated or relatively close to it, ghrelin will kick in telling you that you’re hungry during and/or after workout.

  • Weigh yourself before and after workouts – For every 1lb lost, drink 16-24 oz. of water.

 

Excess Post-Oxygen Consumption (EPOC)

EPOC is the oxygen uptake above resting values used to restore the body to the pre-exercise condition.  Some of the elements during EPOC are the re-synthesis of ATP, glycogen, protein and restoration of oxygen levels. These elements are refueled from nutrition. After workouts, our energy substrates are low which causes a need for refuel leading to hunger.

 

 

Baechle Thomas R., Earle Roger W., Essentials of strength and conditioning, National Strength and Conditioning Association; Third edition.

https://www.acefitness.org/blog/5008/7-things-to-know-about-excess-post-exercise-oxygen

https://www.ncaa.org/sites/default/files/Performance%20Hydration%20Fact%20Sheet.pdf

 

By Jesse Rodriguez

Jesse is a nutritional science major with an emphasis in sports nutrition. Jesse swam for the El Salvador national team and competed at the international level. Jesse is currently working towards a CSCS and registered dietitian license. He currently works at UCLA as a sports nutrition intern assisting both dietitians with meal plans, body composition, and education materials. Jesse is a member of the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics and Collegiate & Professional Sports Dietitians Association.

How Vitamins Affect Sports Performance

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By Jesse Rodriguez

An apple a day keeps the doctor away right? Not quite since dietary guidelines recommended us to consume ~3-5 servings of fruits and vegetables a day. Vegetables, specifically, are overlooked but they shouldn’t as they are superfoods. Mom was right when nagging us about eating our veggies at the dinner table.

Vitamins are our main focus here and how it can help performance. There are two types of vitamins:

  • Water soluble – Vitamins B and C
  • Fat soluble – Vitamin A, D, E, and K
*Vitamins A, C, and E have antioxidant effects

The difference between the two are the elements of metabolism. Some water-soluble vitamins require digestion while some don’t, however, they are all absorbed in the small intestine then transported through the blood to their target areas. Similarly, some fat-soluble vitamins require digestion while some don’t. In order to get absorbed, it must be incorporated into a micelle with the help of bile. The micelle then gets absorbed into the intestinal cells by passive diffusion in the small intestine. Those with diseases or complications may have trouble absorbing vitamins or producing the necessary enzymes for metabolism.

Vitamins help performance in many ways such as serving as antioxidants to reduce inflammation or working with minerals such as calcium to promote bone strength. Furthermore, some fruits can serve as a pre-workout packed with carbohydrates with a low glycemic index providing a steady dose of carbs throughout the workout. Additionally, fruits contain fructose, a simple sugar, that is digested quickly aiding in glycogen replenishment. Because vitamins have various benefits, I will cover only a handful of fruits and vegetables that can help your health and performance.

  • Fish, Beef, Yogurt, Milk, Chicken – Vitamin B12
    • Helps formation of red blood cells
    • Maintain brain function
    • Create and breakdown protein and fat
  • Pears – Vitamins C, K, B3, B6, B9
    • Increase energy levels
    • Aids in digestion
    • Decrease blood pressure
  • Cucumbers – Vitamins C, K, B1, B7
    • Aids in protection of brain
    • Increase digestive health
    • Decreases stress
    • Freshens your breath!
  • Milk, Eggs, – Vitamin D
    • Increase bone strength
    • May increase musculoskeletal health
    • May improve muscle efficiency
  • Oranges, Carrots, Milk – Vitamin A
    • Aid in vision and cellular differentiation
    • Promotes eye health
    • Antioxidant effects helping in muscle recovery

To summarize, vitamins are imperative to our health and can aid in performance. Add a banana or apple to your mid-day snack. You can also try things like carrots with hummus, celery sticks with peanut butter or steamed broccoli with your dinner. Eating your servings of fruits and vegetables doesn’t have be boring so mix it in with your daily foods. Eating a balanced diet includes all food groups containing vitamins which are important for different functions in the body

 

Jesse Rodriguez is a nutritional science major with an emphasis in sports nutrition. Jesse swam for the El Salvador national team and competed at the international level. Jesse is currently working towards a CSCS and registered dietitian license. He currently works at UCLA as a sports nutrition intern assisting both dietitians with meal plans, body composition, and education materials. Jesse is a member of the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics and Collegiate & Professional Sports Dietitians Association.

Prebiotics vs Probiotics

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By Jesse Rodriguez

Gut bacteria has been a trend lately, and there is a good reason why its talked about but what is gut bacteria? And why is it good?

Let’s talk about the bacteria in our gut. Our bodies contain about 100 trillion bacteria living in our gut, also known as Microbiome. Microbiome synthesize neurotransmitters that communicate to the brain impacting our immune system, brain, weight, and mood. It’s also important to know that one’s genetics, diet, and environment influence these microbes.

Many people have heard about prebiotic and probiotic but what are they? Both are found in supplements but there’s no need to cash in on these supplements when they’re readily available in our everyday foods.

  • Prebiotic – “nondigestible food ingredients that beneficially affect the host by selectively stimulating the growth and/or activity of one or a limited number of bacteria in the colon, thus improving host health”
  • Probiotic – “live microorganisms (i.e bifidobacteria and lactobacilli) intended to promote health benefits”

Simply put, prebiotics promote the growth of helpful bacteria in your gut while probiotics are the good bacteria that live in the gut; prebiotics are the food for probiotics. They work together to improve GI health, enhance calcium absorption, boost immunity, and overall health and wellbeing. As a result, they may positively impact your health which then affects performance ultimately affecting your goals. Because prebiotics are fiber, adequate intake has been shown to:

  • Control appetite
  • Control development of Type II diabetes
  • Regulate body weight
  • Alleviate inflammation, typically irritable bowel syndrome

Because these are found in many foods, here is a list of common foods containing prebiotics and probiotics or containing both, called synbiotics:

Prebiotic foods:

  • Bananas
  • Garlic
  • Onions
  • Asparagus
  • Artichokes
  • Soybeans
  • Oats
  • Wheat
  • Leeks
  • Chicory

Probiotic Foods:

  • Yogurt
  • Kimchi
  • Miso
  • Pickles
  • Green Peas
  • Kefir products
  • Sauerkraut
  • Tempeh
  • Dark Chocolate
  • Natto

Synbiotic Foods:

  • Yogurt + Honey
  • Yogurt + Banana
  • Oats + Dark Chocolate
  • Legumes + Pickles
  • Miso Soup + Garlic

Incorporate these meals into your diet as a snack or dinner to increase your overall wellbeing.

(2016) Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. http://www.eatright.org/resource/food/vitaminsand-supplements/nutrient-rich-foods/prebiotics-and-probiotics-the-dynamic-duo

Ho, N., & Prasad, V. (2013). Probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics and naturally fermented foods: why more may be more. Annals of Gastroenterology : Quarterly Publication of the Hellenic Society of Gastroenterology, 26(3), 277–278.

Slavin, J. (2013). Fiber and Prebiotics: Mechanisms and Health Benefits. Nutrients, 5(4), 1417– 1435. http://doi.org/10.3390/nu5041417

 

 

Jesse Rodriguez is a nutritional science major with an emphasis in sports nutrition. Jesse swam for the El Salvador national team and competed at the international level. Jesse is currently working towards a CSCS and registered dietitian license. He currently works at UCLA as a sports nutrition intern assisting both dietitians with meal plans, body composition, and education materials. Jesse is a member of the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics and Collegiate & Professional Sports Dietitians Association.